Speak Up – Advocating for You and Your Library

What do you think of when you hear the word "advocacy"? Do you immediately think of stumping on Capitol Hill and meeting with local government officials? "Advocacy" is much more than politics. Every day, librarians and staff find themselves in situations where they must advocate for resources, money, and services for their libraries, in addition to advocating for themselves and their career as professionals.

Join us on September 12 for an Amigos Library Services online conference, Speak Up – Advocating for You and Your Library, where we will explore advocacy beyond politics.

For more information about this conference, contact Jodie Borgerding, borgerding@amigos.org or 800-843-8482 ext. 2897.

Wed 9/12/18
Times - CDT
Session (45 min each)
Presenter(s)
10:00 am
Opening Keynote - Our Success is Your Success: Using Partner Power to Advocate
(show session description)
Elise Granata
11:00 am
Break
11:15 am
Budgeting for Library Resources to Support Online Academic Programs: Advocacy and Strategy
(show session description)
Mark McCallon
11:15 am
Making Room for Moms: Advocating for a Lactation Space in the Library
(show session description)
Heidi Blackburn and Joyce Neujahr
11:15 am
Crafting Your Library Story to Leverage Resources
(show session description)
Keturah Capadonia
12:00 am
Break
12:15 pm
Outreach as Advocacy: Utilizing Library Goals to Communicate our Value at a For-Profit College
(show session description)
Jessica Kiebler and Stella Sigal
12:15 pm
Building Your Brand and Communicating for Collaboration in a Brand-New Role
(show session description)
Laura Birkenhauer
12:15 pm
Collaborations That Payoff: Rethinking Services Within a University Library
(show session description)
April Aultman Becker
1:00 pm
Lunch Break
2:00 pm
Professional Networks as Advocacy Apparatus
(show session description)
Jeremy Johannesen
2:00 pm
Embedded Director: Public Office Hours, Engaging in Community Events & Creating a Community Report to Tell Your Library’s Story
(show session description)
Scott Jarzombek
2:00 pm
Tell Your Story, Share Your Impact
(show session description)
Kimberley Lindskog
2:45 pm
Break
3:00 pm
Strategic Storytelling as Advocacy and Marketing
(show session description)
Jennifer Burke

Wednesday 9/12/2018
Elise Granata portrait

Keynote Speaker: Elise Granata - elise@santacruzmah.org

Session Time: 10:00 - 11:00 a.m. CDT

Keynote Session Title: Our Success is Your Success: Using Partner Power to Advocate

Session Description: We become more powerful advocates in our careers, libraries, and world when our success is rooted in our community, not us. Using the Partner Power framework from the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History (MAH), Elise Granata will share key tools, examples, and pathways for you to build successful advocacy in your role through community engagement.

Speaker Bio: Elise Granata is the Brand & Community Experience Manager at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History, where she has worked in marketing, fundraising, and community experience through a five-year period of explosive growth for the organization. She has volunteered with civic life as part of the Santa Cruz Downtown Library Committee and Downtown Association and with local social organizations to better engage their community. She graduated with a BA in Arts Management from SUNY Purchase College and comes to the MAH after work in music, theatre, dance, and booking Zombie Proms and Roller Discos on the east coast.

Mark McCallon portrait

Speaker: Mark McCallon - mccallonm@acu.edu

Session Time: 11:15 - 12:00 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Budgeting for Library Resources to Support Online Academic Programs: Advocacy and Strategy

Session Description: For many years our library's funding has come directly from the parent organization to support all academic programs without taking into account the additional funding needed for new resources to support programs that are currently moving to online and new online programs that have recently started. This has led to a flat budget allocation that decreases the library's purchasing power and forces significant cuts in resources that are detrimental to students and faculty.

In response to this situation, our library has gained partnership with deans and program chairs to develop a "blended funding" model where support has come through common actions on both the part of the academic programs and the library to support existing resources and also add new resources in support of students and faculty. This presentation will discuss the background of the partnerships and share the contents of our memorandums of understanding that have helped us to generate new funding streams of support for online learners and identify programmatic priorities that are funded at higher levels.

Speaker Bio: Dr. Mark McCallon is the Associate Dean for Library Information Services at Abilene Christian University. He has been involved in library services for online learners since 2006. His responsibilities have included budgeting and resource allocation for the library's online databases as well as acquisitions and assessment for the library's e-books and databases.

Heidi Blackburn portrait

Speakers: Heidi Blackburn - hblackburn@unomaha.edu and Joyce Neujahr - jneujahr@unomaha.edu

Session Time: 11:15 - 12:00 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Making Room for Moms: Advocating for a Lactation Space in the Library

Session Description: Women make up 80% of the library workplace and 56% of the student body population in higher education (Department of Education, 2017). They make up 53% of the faculty, staff, and administration in public universities in the United States (Chronicle of Higher Education, 2017). Yet, it was easy for us to overlook a smaller, specific population: How was our organization serving moms? The University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) Criss Library staff saw a need within our own work place for employees, which opened our eyes to a larger problem for patrons: a lactation space. Where could new mothers go to express breast milk or to feed their child (in a clean and private place) before going back to work or to a campus event? This led to a discussion between library units and eventually to collaborating with the UNO Chancellor’s Commission on the Status of Women (CCSW) to advocate for the construction of a lactation space within the library for all mothers. This self-advocacy not only strengthened employee morale internally, but also strengthened our connection with CCSW and campus leadership as library advocates.

Joyce Neujahr portrait

This presentation will review the logistics for advocating for a lactation space, finding best practices, and our challenges and how we overcame them (including budgeting, retrofitting a space, and administrative red tape). Additionally, we will share updates about the construction of our lactation space and lessons learned from this project. The recruitment and retention of female students and employees matters in higher education and this lactation space is a physical representation of our family-friendly and inclusive policies at Criss Library and UNO.

Speaker Bio: Dr. Heidi Blackburn is the UNO Criss Library STEM and Business Librarian at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where she is liaison to the College of Information Science & Technology, College of Business Administration, and science and engineering programs. She is also the current Faculty Co-Chair of the UNO Chancellor’s Commission on the Status of Women (CCSW). She holds a Masters and a Ph.D. in Library and Information Science from Emporia State University and is published in Science & Technology Libraries, Library Hi Tech, Journal of Library & Information Services in Distance Learning, Academic Exchange Quarterly, and Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship, among others.

Speaker Bio: Joyce Neujahr is currently Director of Patron Services at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library, a position she has held since 2008. Neujahr received her Masters of Library Science degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Keturah Cappadonia portrait

Speaker: Keturah Cappadonia - cappadoniak@stls.org

Session Time: 11:15 - 12:00 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Crafting Your Library Story to Leverage Resources

Session Description: Stories unite communities. People tell stories to teach lessons, motivate, brighten someone's day, and so much more. But the heart of a good story is the people behind it. Stories are also a powerful advocacy tool for libraries. Are you effectively collecting stories from your community members and using them to advertise your library's programs and services? Sure your library does great things, but do people know about them? This session will cover methods of gathering stories, sharing them in your community, and engaging stakeholders and funders in telling stories about the impacts your library makes.

Speaker Bio: Keturah Cappadonia is the Outreach Consultant for the Southern Tier Library System, where she consults with 48 member libraries across five counties in New York State's rural Southern Tier. She holds an MLIS from the University of Pittsburgh and has worked in public libraries for nine years, continually focusing on the importance of advocacy especially in small and rural libraries. She currently serves as a member of the American Library Association's Committee on Library Advocacy and is a regular participant in the New York State Library Association's Library Advocacy Day.

Jessica Kiebler portrait

Speakers: Jessica Kiebler - jessica-kiebler@berkeleycollege.edu and Stella Sigal - stella-sigal@berkeleycollege.edu

Session Time: 12:15 - 1:00 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Outreach as Advocacy: Utilizing Library Goals to Communicate our Value at a For-Profit College

Session Description: Library outreach should be used not only as an opportunity to create relationships, but also create change through those connections. At the Berkeley College Library, an Outreach & Marketing Committee (O&M) was created with the goal of implementing consistent outreach campaigns to improve awareness of library services and resources and build relationships throughout the College community. This presentation will discuss how the O&M Committee uses the library's strategic goals to create cohesive communication strategies and design successful outreach to form strong connections with patrons and stakeholders.

Stella Sigal portrait

We will present outreach examples such as an augmented reality partnership with the admissions department, a LibGuide newsletter targeted to faculty and a campus-wide promotion of our LibAnswers platform. These campaigns have shown our library’s value to prospective & current students, other college departments and the important stakeholders. By effectively communicating our value through outreach and advocacy, the O&M Committee has assisted the library in gaining a seat at the table in campus-wide conversations that contribute to retention, information literacy education and student success.

Speaker Bio: Jessica Kiebler, Library Director, Berkeley College White Plains, NY

Speaker Bio: Stella Sigal is a Research and Instruction Librarian at Berkeley College (White Plains, NY). She received her Bachelor's in Art History at NYU and her MSLIS from Pratt Institute. She has worked at a wide range of institutions - from museum libraries to a medical college library. Her interests include - student user experience and library marketing, as well as holistic medicine and aromatherapy.

Laura Birkenhauer portrait

Speaker: Laura Birkenhauer - crosbylm@miamioh.edu

Session Time: 12:15 - 1:00 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Building Your Brand and Communicating for Collaboration in a Brand-New Role

Session Description: Newly created roles in libraries are an exciting opportunity, but can also be confusing for colleagues, your campus, and community. The confusion is only compounded when a position breaks with tradition or is built on emerging ideas in the field. How can you cultivate collaboration when you and others struggle to define your new duties? A Student Success Librarian speaks to the process of personal branding, crafting a communication plan and networking with coworkers and campus units in a brand new, nontraditional role in an academic library.

Speaker Bio: Laura Birkenhauer is the Student Success Librarian for Campus Engagement at Miami University Libraries in Oxford, OH. Laura has worked for Miami University since 2011, as both library paraprofessional staff and a resident librarian. She graduated with an M.L.I.S. from Kent State University in 2012.

April Aultman Becker portrait

Speaker: April Aultman Becker - april.becker@sulross.edu

Session Time: 12:15 - 1:00 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Collaborations That Payoff: Rethinking Services Within a University Library

Session Description: Developing relationships with the community and collaborating with other groups on campus can raise the profile of your college library. Hear about two successful collaborations (one on campus, the other within the community) that have resulted in more patrons and more money flowing through one university library.

Speaker Bio: April Aultman Becker obtained her BA in English and History from Stephen F. Austin State University, and her MLIS from the University of North Texas. In her past life, April was a high school English and Creative Writing teacher and an elementary, high school, community college, and medical librarian. These days, April is the Dean of Libraries and Research Technologies at Sul Ross State University in Alpine, Texas, way out in the Big Bend region.

Jeremy Johannesen portrait

Speaker: Jeremy Johannesen - director@nyla.org

Session Time: 2:00 - 2:45 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Professional Networks as Advocacy Apparatus

Session Description: Every library, librarian, and patron has a role to play in fearlessly advocating for libraries. Learn how to leverage your professional networks to build your base and win the support of your community. Effective coalition building and collaboration techniques can cement the position of your library as the cornerstone of your community.

Speaker Bio: Having served as a Deputy Director of New York Library Association (NYLA) from 2005 – ‘08, Johannesen left to lead the New York State (NYS) Alliance for Arts Education. Jeremy returned to NYLA in 2012, assuming the role of Executive Director. Johannesen holds his BS in Arts Education from the College of Saint Rose, and is recognized as a Certified Association Executive (CAE) by the American Society of Association Executives. When not working for libraries, Jeremy volunteers for them, serving as the President of his hometown Friends of Bethlehem Public Library.

Scott Jarzombek portrait

Speaker: Scott Jarzombek - jarzombeks@albanypubliclibrary.org

Session Time: 2:00 - 2:45 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Embedded Director: Public Office Hours, Engaging in Community Events & Creating a Community Report to Tell Your Library’s Story

Session Description: Library leaders can no longer hide in their offices. It is the director’s responsibility to represent the organization and to draw attention to the excellent work done by staff. The organization is responsible to its stakeholders including its investors: the taxpayers. Library leaders should be out in the community, not just on the public floors of their own facility, but actually out at community meetings, public forums, neighborhood events, and business gatherings. This session will cover running public office hours, where the director sets up shop in an open part of the library and meets with the public and frontline staff. It will cover how to stay on message and effectively mitigate complaints and suggestions. The session will also discuss how librarians and administrators can become active in the community. It will suggest the types of organizations to interact with, how to tailor your message to interest your different audiences, and provide examples of how this has worked for the Albany Public Library. Lastly, it will cover annual community reports, including how they should be prepared and presented in multiple formats and discussed at public meetings in the community. The hope is that this session will inspire library leaders to become community leaders, and in doing so, secure appropriate funding for our organizations.

Speaker Bio: Scott C. Jarzombek has served as Executive Director of Albany Public Library (APL), a system of seven neighborhood libraries serving New York’s capital city, since June 2014. He oversees the most extensive school district library in New York State with an operational budget of $7 million, just over 134 staff, and more than 50,000 cardholders. Jarzombek started his professional career at APL where he worked as a Librarian at the Howe Branch in the South End for nine years. He left that position to develop his career and gain administrative and leadership experience. During his hiatus from APL, Jarzombek served as Head of Youth Services at Poughkeepsie Public Library District for two years. He moved into the chief executive role as Director of Pawling Free Library for two years and then worked as Director of North Castle Public Library for one year. He holds a Master of Library Science degree from the University at Albany. Since returning to Albany Public Library as Executive Director, he led the organization through four successful budget votes with the average approval being over 70 percent. He has been asked to testify to the New York State Assembly and the Regents Advisory Council about library funding and has done multiple long and short media appearances and blogs for the Albany Times Union.

Kimberley Lindskog portrait

Speaker: Kimberley Lindskog - klindskog@parkwayschools.net

Session Time: 2:00 - 2:45 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Tell Your Story, Share Your Impact

Session Description: Advocacy doesn’t just happen; it needs to be intentional, so making our stories visible through data provides evidence of value and impact on student learning. Sharing library experiences about leading, teaching, and student empowerment provided opportunities to frame what we wanted the users to know, justified our actions, and determined our priorities for not only this year but for the future. In order to market our connection to the community, the data collected to create the story must be structured around library frameworks, related to school and classroom goals, and illustrate a responsiveness to community. Listen to stories, strategies and ideas around telling your library story.

Speaker Bio: Kim Lindskog is a part of the Teaching, Learning and Accountability team as a Library Support Specialist in the Parkway School District in St. Louis, MO. She serves on the METC (Midwest Education Technology Conference) advisory committee and is a member of the Educational Technology Association of St. Louis. She embraces her role in supporting librarians and sharing her knowledge with districts across the area by regularly presenting at conferences including ISTE, METC, MOREnet M3, MASL (Missouri Association of School Librarians) and SLRLN (St. Louis Regional Library Network). Kim’s focus is to help define what it means to be a digital age librarian, craft spaces that promote individual and community growth, and create opportunities through transformative ideas that change the connection from the past to the future for library programs. Through this work, Kim, a Google Certified Trainer, is able to work with both students and adults to make GAFE technology integration, reading, and information literacy an authentic part of the classroom experience. She is also a member of ISTE/METC Affiliate, American Association of School Librarians, and GEG of Eastern Missouri.

Jennifer Burke portrait

Speaker: Jennifer Burke - jburke@intellicraftresearch.com

Session Time: 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. CDT

Session Title: Strategic Storytelling as Advocacy and Marketing

Session Description: Stories are emotional, inspirational, aspirational, educational, relationship builders, connection creators and loved by all. Stories can cut through the clutter and noise of other communications and competition for the attention of our audiences and community members. We already know that people respond enthusiastically to stories, much more so than stats, numbers, or dry facts. Humans are wired for stories. And who knows stories better than libraries?! What are the core stories your library should be telling in its marketing? When you know what stories to focus on, it makes it easier to create compelling copy and messages. BUT … we often don’t do a good enough job of telling our OWN library story. So, let’s get better at it. Marketing is part of advocating for our libraries, and I firmly believe marketing is just a form of storytelling. Let’s build our strategic storytelling skills so that we can create effective, compelling, engaging messages of advocacy that our stakeholders, partners, and community want to share. Let’s revisit the basics of storytelling and learn to apply those frameworks to our communications. Do you know who the “hero” is in your stories? Learn the common types of stories that libraries need to be telling about themselves. Identify the emotion you want to invoke in your library’s audience for each specific piece of communication. Be ready to implement one or more of those story ideas to craft a message around in the following month.

Speaker Bio: Jennifer E. Burke is President of IntelliCraft Research LLC (www.intellicraftresearch.com), a strategic marketing consultancy for libraries, in Philadelphia. She’s a former advertising executive and now a trainer on strategic storytelling. She holds a B.S. in Communications with a TV/Film minor from Northwestern University, an M.S.L.I.S. from Drexel University, and spent 5 years as an IMLS Fellow in Drexel’s Information Studies Ph.D. program. She’s the President of the Board of Directors for the nonprofit, Library Marketing Conference Group.